Thursday, January 26, 2006

Gore accuses big oil of bankrolling Tories

Idiot Watch: Gore goes postal on Harper. Maybe he isn't aware that corporate donations are limited to 1,000 each. Even if 100 companies in the oil business gave the maximum amount, 100,000 amounts to squat. OH Al Gore. First you invent the Internet, next you....nevermind. Al Gore, in his own words:

Gore accuses big oil of bankrolling Tories:
"Former U.S. vice-president Al Gore has accused the oil industry of financially backing the Tories and their 'ultra-conservative leader' to protect its stake in Alberta's lucrative oilsands.

Canadians, Gore said, should vigilantly keep watch over prime minister-designate Stephen Harper because he has a pro-oil agenda and wants to pull out of the Kyoto accord -- an international agreement to combat climate change.

'The election in Canada was partly about the tar sands projects in Alberta,' Gore said Wednesday while attending the Sundance Film Festival in Utah.

'And the financial interests behind the tar sands project poured a lot of money and support behind an ultra-conservative leader in order to win the election . . . and to protect their interests.'"

11 comments:

Lumo said...

After Al Gore invented the Internet as well as algorithms, his mind has apparently started to evaporate. His theories are on par with the conspiratory theories of LaRouche.

Anonymous said...

Can someone find me a direct quote where Al Gore claimed to invent the internet?

He was a major player in its development, but I contend that he never made that claim. Proof me wrong :)
Dave

Jonathan said...

The quote originated on Larry King:

http://www.cnn.com/ALLPOLITICS/stories/1999/03/09/president.2000/transcript.gore/

BLITZER: I want to get to some of the substance of domestic and international issues in a minute, but let's just wrap up a little bit of the politics right now.

Why should Democrats, looking at the Democratic nomination process, support you instead of Bill Bradley, a friend of yours, a former colleague in the Senate? What do you have to bring to this that he doesn't necessarily bring to this process?

GORE: Well, I will be offering -- I'll be offering my vision when my campaign begins. And it will be comprehensive and sweeping. And I hope that it will be compelling enough to draw people toward it. I feel that it will be.

But it will emerge from my dialogue with the American people. I've traveled to every part of this country during the last six years. During my service in the United States Congress, I took the initiative in creating the Internet. I took the initiative in moving forward a whole range of initiatives that have proven to be important to our country's economic growth and environmental protection, improvements in our educational system.

Anonymous said...

I don't see him saying that he "invented the internet" in that quote. And you likely know that to say so is quite a stretch. Credibility ......

He was speaking in the piece that you provide of his work in comparison to others in Congress. He was quite correct in taking credit for having played an important role in the development of the net.

Below is a quote from two fellows that could loosely claim to have invented the internet ( in 1973 they began research into what eventually becomes IP - the Internet Protocol and its companion, TCP - the Transmission Control Protocol):


"Al Gore and the Internet

By Robert Kahn and Vinton Cerf
Al Gore was the first political leader to recognize the importance of the
Internet and to promote and support its development.

No one person or even small group of persons exclusively "invented" the
Internet. It is the result of many years of ongoing collaboration among
people in government and the university community. But as the two people
who designed the basic architecture and the core protocols that make the
Internet work, we would like to acknowledge VP Gore's contributions as a
Congressman, Senator and as Vice President. No other elected official, to
our knowledge, has made a greater contribution over a longer period of time."
Source: http://www.interesting-people.org/archives/interesting-people/200009/msg00052.html

Anonymous said...

Gore is almost certainly right about this part: "The election in Canada was partly about the tar sands projects in Alberta." While it was not an up-front campaign issue, the Albertan oil sands are the veritable talk of the town amongst executive and oil baron types. Hell, bust out the internet for this one: Google "Alberta tar sands." There's chatter about its potential that goes as deep as the oil itself.

Alberta voted 100% blue this election. Read that: one...hundred...percent Conservative. Even former deputy prime minister Anne McLellan lost her seat.

There's more to winning elections than voter mood swings. Money is being spent that goes far beyond party budgets. Buying out would-be candidates to make sure they don't run in a riding that must host a star candidate: $40,000. Pouring thousands of dollars into the campaigns of people like Laurie Hawn...it adds up.

And please note, corporate donations are NOT capped at $1000 - that's what Harper hopes to implement with the Federal Accountability Act. Additionally, please note that ANY cap would only affect the donations to the PARTY itself. That does not affect or limit outside consultants or agencies that have been contracted by the party to assist with war-room strategizing.

Al Gore said that big oil "poured a lot of money and support behind an ultra-conservative leader in order to win the election . . . and to protect their interests." I can't vouch for the truth of that statement, but I know from working in the Conservative war room that the Conservatives were getting a hell of a lot of money from somewhere...

- simian.

Anonymous said...

Maybe it's time a Canadian said something about this goof Al Gore. There is NO party in Canada that is right of the Democrats - not one. All parties are in favour of socialized medicine, all parties have spent billions on various social programs, no party is anti-gay marriage, (though individuals may be, and have that right as individuals), and we are taxed accordingly. As Al Gore knows nothing about this, and is obviously just parroting whatever his special interest backers what him to say, he should find out something about Mr. Harper first.

Jonathan said...

First of all, corporate donations IS capped at $1000. http://www.sfu.ca/~aheard/elections/laws.html

As for war room stuff...I don't know how that works. They did a hell of a job in the war room though this election.

Secondly, "I took the initiative in creating the Internet" is only as out of context as Gore uses it in. Sure, Gore helped the Internet get off its feet. But the Internet had nothing to do with Gore. Some might even argue that some of his failed policies, which, if passed, would have hindered the Internet's implementation. But that is a discussion for another day. The point is...Al Gore goofed. He should have taken credit for nothing.

Third, yes to the last commenter. It is indeed sad there is no party right of the democrats in Canada. Although, I don't necessarily think you can pin a party on a scale, per se. I mean, even some parts of the Conservative platform might be left of the Liberals but right of the Republicans. Sticking people into place is hard. But the overall point is well made. We are defining the political debate on the terms of a political axis that is tiled left. The NDP may not have had any effect on the passage of bills in Parliament, but they certainly helped to frame the debate in their favour.

Jonathan said...

And to the fellow in the war room. Who was the mole?

Anonymous said...

Well he never said that he invented the internet. He took the initiative when compared to the other members of congress. Perhaps he could of used better words, but for you to misrepresent it is really low, and says much about how much the rest of your stuff should be trusted. Dave

Jonathan said...

I am not misrepresenting anything. ARPANET, which later became the Internet, began to be thought up in 1967, a full 20 years before Gore became a senator. Don't tell me that I am stooping low. The internet and the infrastructure of the internet was around long before Al Gore came along. Gore didn't take the initiative to create the internet because the Internet already existed before he was in a position to do anything. Sure, Al Gore advocated infrastructure. But so what? The initiative to create the internet began long before a massive infrastructure was developed.

Anonymous said...

"I am not misrepresenting anything. ARPANET, which later became the Internet, began to be thought up in 1967, a full 20 years before Gore became a senator. Don't tell me that I am stooping low. The internet and the infrastructure of the internet was around long before Al Gore came along. Gore didn't take the initiative to create the internet because the Internet already existed before he was in a position to do anything. Sure, Al Gore advocated infrastructure. But so what? The initiative to create the internet began long before a massive infrastructure was developed."

Easy buddy, thats a dead horse you're floggin there ...